Days of Yore
.Kings Highway (113K)
as recounted by

Bill Day

 


A walking tour of the past
Starting on a hypothetical walk on the Main street from the speed line on the Tanner street side of the highway, and on that jaunt attempting to remember what that scene was in the era around 1919.

The first establishment coming down from the railroad was Child's Grocers Store, the Dunlop's Store.  John the Shoemaker, Maurice Milask's Fruit Store, Regensberg's Store, Flitcraft's Drug Store, Grace Episcopal Church, the rectory, Brown's Florist Shop, Cutler's dry goods store, Ben Fowler's residence, Ricci's, Terry's electric, Mr. Ding's Chinese laundry, Globe Meat Market, McGill's paperhanging shop, and Hobby Williamson's Barber Shop was on the Tanner street corner.  On the other corner was Frank Romano's Store, next was Eisele and Manning's plumbing supply, then three little row homes that were the residences of Miss Middleton, John Sterling, and Mr Brick.  Next was the Bell Telephone exchange, Pete's Restaurant, Muller's Bakery, Lytell's Delicatessen, Hen Coward's Barber Shop, Coxey's Restaurant, Cowperthwaite's Hardware Store, a Harness Shop on the corner of Mechanic street.  On the other corner was Willard's Drug Store, Bill Flynn's Real Estate Office, Peacock's Grocery, Squire Harrison's residence and office, Dumphey's Louie Reinhart's Barber Shop, Hunt's Meat Market, Bray[s Candy Store and on the corner of Haddon avenue was Feistein's Dry Good Store.  Lamont's Hardware was on the other corner, and next was the Atmore Tea Company, Milask's Ice Cream Parlor, the Movies, Miss Oldds' residence, LaBove's tailor shop, Kate Horter's house on the Friends avenue corner, and on the other corner was the mansion of Mayor John Lippincott.

This completes the tour of the business section of the Main street as the remainder of east Kings Highway was residential with the exception of the Indian King and the Artisans Hall on the corner of Grove street.  It was enjoyable trying to remember the old places that once existed on our Main street, which even then were constantly changing, as they are today.

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